CERL
  Center for Empirical Research in the Law
 


Graduate Student Associates
Betul Demirkaya received her BA and MA in political science from Bogazici University, Turkey. She is currently a PhD candidate in the Department of Political Science at Washington University in St. Louis. She studies comparative political institutions and democratic representation using formal theory, quantitative methods, and computational text analysis.
email website

Jay Krehbiel received his BA in International Political Studies, History and German from Drury University. He is currently a fifth year graduate student in political science. His research interests focus on comparative political institutions, specifically comparative judicial politics and the consequences of separation of powers systems for the efficacy of constitutional review.
email website curr vit

Ian Turner received his BA, with honors, in both political science and philosophy from the University of Pittsburgh. He is currently a third year graduate student in political science. His current research interests focus on the inter-institutional interactions between Congress, executive/administrative agencies, and courts, and formal models of political communication/elections.
email curr vit
 
CERL Alumni
Michael Nelson (2012-2014 GSA)
Michael Nelson received his BA in Political Science and English from Drake University and was a Graduate Student Associate from 2010-2014 and is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the Pennsylvania State University. His research interests include judicial politics, both in the U.S. at the state and federal levels and in comparative perspective.

In 2014, Michael became an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the Pennsylvania State University.

Alicia Uribe (2012-2014 GSA)
Alicia Uribe received her AB, with high honors, in Political Science from the University of California, Davis in 2006. She is currently a fourth year graduate student in Political Science. Her research interests focus on judicial politics, most particularly the Supreme Court's interaction with other governmental institutions and the public. Her dissertation focuses on appointments to the federal judiciary.

Alicia joined the faculty at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in Fall 2014.

Morgan Hazelton (2011-2014 GSA)
In 2014, Morgan became an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Saint Louis University.

Elizabeth Coggins (2013-2014 Fellow)
Elizabeth Coggins received her BA in political science from Wake Forest University in 2004. In 2013, she received her PhD from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, with concentrations in American Politics and Methodology. Her research interests include ideological identification, public opinion, policy mood, and political psychology. Her current work centers on liberal identification in a longitudinal sense, confronting a central paradox of American politics: how can liberal policy programs remain widely supported and liberal politicians continue to win elections when the liberal identity itself is out-favored by the conservative identity nearly two-to-one?

In the summer of 2014, Elizabeth was appointed Assistant Professor of Political Science at Colorado College.

Rachael Hinkle (2009-2013 GSA)
Rachael Hinkle received her BA summa cum laude in History from Huntington University in 2000 and her J.D. with high distinction from Ohio Northern University in 2003. After clerking for Judge Robert C. Broomfield (United States District Court, District of Arizona) and Judge David W. McKeague (United States Court of Appeals, Sixth Circuit), she completed her Master's Degree in Political Science at the University of Toledo. Her research agenda focuses on judicial politics with particular attention to gleaning insights from the content of judicial opinions through the use of computational text analytic techniques.

In the summer of 2013 Rachael became an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

Amanda Driscoll (2007-2012 GSA)
Amanda Driscoll received her BA in Spanish and Latin American Studies at Gonzaga University, her MA in Political Science from the University of Arizona and her PhD in Political Science from Washington University in St. Louis. Her research interests center on comparative democratic institutions with special regard for legislative and judicial institutions in Latin America.

In the summer of 2012 Amanda became an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Florida State University.

Patrick Wohlfarth (2010-2011 Fellow)
Patrick Wohlfarth received his PhD in Political Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2010. His research interests include American politics and quantitative methodology with a specific focus on judicial politics, interinstitutional politics, and time series analysis. His research examines judicial influence on the executive branch, executive branch litigation on the U.S. Supreme Court, the influence of public opinion on the U.S. Supreme Court, and bureaucratic politics. Patrick's published research has appeared or is forthcoming in the American Journal of Political Science and The Journal of Politics.

In summer of 2011 Patrick was appointed Assistant Professor of Government and Politics at the University of Maryland.

Mark Ramirez (2009-2010 Fellow)
Mark Ramirez received his PhD in Political Science from Texas A&M University. His research interests include American politics and quantitative methodology with a specific interest in public opinion, political psychology, race and politics, and the linkages between the public and political institutions.

In summer of 2010 Mark became an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Arizona State.

Xun Pang (2008-2010 GSA)
Xun Pang received her BA in Economics and Political Science at Peking University, China, and her PhD in political science from Peking University and Washington University in St. Louis. Her research focuses on Bayesian Statistics, Political Methodology, Categorical Time-Series Cross-Sectional Analysis, International Relations, and Political Economy.

In summer of 2010 Xun became an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Princeton University.

Ryan Black (2006-2009 GSA)
Ryan Black received his BA in political science from the University of Minnesota in 2004, an AM in political science from Washington University in 2006, and a PhD in Political Science from Washington University in St. Louis.

In summer 2009 Ryan became an Assistant Professor of Political Science at University at Michigan State.

Christina Boyd (2006-2009 GSA)
Christina received her BA with honors in political science from the University of Florida in 2001, her JD from Wake Forest University School of Law in 2004, and her PhD in Political Science from Washington University in Saint Louis. Christina studies judicial politics with a particular focus on decision making in lower federal courts. Her work on the Administrative Office's Terminations Database was recently highlighted on the Empirical Legal Studies Blog, and her research on IFP certiorari petitions was featured on SCOTUSblog.

In summer 2009 Christina became an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University at Buffalo, SUNY.

Delia Bailey (2007-2008 Fellow)
Delia Bailey received her PhD in Social Science from the California Institute of Techology in 2007. Her substantive area of expertise is political methodology, voting behavior, and elections. At Cal Tech she was involved in the Caltech/MIT Voting Technology Project, and on an amicus brief for the United States Supreme Court in Crawford v. Marion County (No. 07-21). After serving for two years as a post-doctoral fellow at CERL, Delia joined YouGov/Polimetrix (http://www.polimetrix.com) as a research scientist.

Ryan Owens (2006-2008 GSA)
CERL Graduate Student Associate and Political Science graduate student Ryan Owens became an Assistant Professor in the Department of Government at Harvard University in Fall 2008. A student of American politics, Ryan's research focuses on the politics of judicial decision making. His dissertation examined whether Justices respond strategically to constraints emanating from the separation of powers built into the Constitution. He worked under the direction of Professors James Spriggs, Andrew Martin, and Steve Smith.

Anton Westveld (2006-2007 Fellow)
Anton received a MA in Applied Statistics from the University of Michigan in 1999, and in 2006 received his PhD in Statistics from the University of Washington. Anton's main research interests include: Bayesian statistics, general applied statistics, relational data, and longitudinal data. In 2007, Anton accepted an Assistant Professorship in statistics at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

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